Child Adversities, Midlife Health, and Elder Abuse: Application of Cumulative Disadvantage Theory to Understand Late Life Victimization

Source: Evident Change

Published: 2021

Summary:

Elder abuse victimization is increasingly recognized as a pressing public health concern. However, few empirical studies have investigated whether childhood adversities and poor physical and psychological health in midlife heighten risks for abuse in late life. The webinar will review prior literature on the topic; describe the methodological approach within a new study by the presenters; highlight major findings; and discuss implications for clinical practice, treatment, and future research on elder abuse. (Materials: slide presentation)

Presenters:

Scott Easton, PhD, is associate professor, chair of the Mental Health Department, and co-director of the Trauma Integration Initiative at the Boston College School of Social Work. His primary program of research investigates long-term health outcomes of adults who experienced early life-course trauma such as child sexual abuse.

Jooyoung Kong, PhD, focuses her research on the effects that childhood adverse experiences have on later-life health and well-being. Guided by the life-course perspective, she is interested in identifying risk factors that prolong the negative impact of childhood adversity on physical, psychological, and social health in adulthood and identifying resilience factors that can mitigate these harmful effects.

Link: Child Adversities, Midlife Health, and Elder Abuse: Application of Cumulative Disadvantage Theory to Understand Late Life Victimization

Topics: Prevention, Reporting, Screening/Assessment

Access: Web-based

Intended Use: Self-directed Learning

Audience: Health Care, Social Services

Level: Advanced, Intermediate

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